How to Trim Your Baby’s Nails

Should I trim my baby’s nails? When can I trim my baby’s nails? How to avoid cutting my baby’s finger while clipping nails?

Your baby’s nails might be softer and more flexible than yours, however make no error– they’re sharp! A newborn has little control over his flailing limbs and can quickly wind up scratching his own face or yours.

Little fingernails grow so fast you might need to cut them a number of times a week. Toe nails need less frequent cutting.

How do I trim my baby’s nails without cutting his fingertips?

The best time to do this is while she’s sleeping. Another great time is right after a bath, when your baby’s nails are softest.

Make certain you have enough light to see what you’re doing. Use a set of baby scissors or clippers made especially to use on tiny fingers. Press the finger pad far from the nail to prevent nicking the skin, and keep a firm hold on your baby’s hand as you clip.

Cut fingernails along the curve of the finger. Cut toenails straight across. Then use an emery board to ravel rough edges.

cut my baby's nails

Doctors suggest using an emery board in the first few weeks of a new baby’s life since nails are extremely soft. And new parents are also more likely to accidentally clip their baby’s skin.

If you decide to give your baby a manicure while she’s awake, ask your partner or a friend to hold her and keep her from wiggling too much while you work. Or have somebody distract her so she’ll let you hold her hand still for the clipping and filing.

Some parents bite their baby’s nails into shape, but doing it by doing this might introduce bacteria from your mouth into any little cut your baby might have on her finger. You likewise won’t have the ability to see what you’re doing, and you’ll find that your baby’s finger is tiny compared to your teeth!

If I do cut a fingertip, how do I stop the bleeding?

If you do nick a tiny fingertip, don’t be too hard on yourself– it happens to lots of parents. Just wash the cut under cool water, then cover a tissue around your baby’s finger and hold it with a little pressure. The bleeding normally stops in a few minutes.

Withstand the temptation to aim to put a plaster on your baby’s finger. It’s most likely to come off when he puts his finger in his mouth, and he might end up choking on it.

Video: How To Cut Baby Nails | Tips For Dads

Likewise, medical professionals don’t recommend using a liquid bandage product for infants or young children since they’ll probably suck it off. If your child has a wound that doesn’t stop bleeding, it’s a smart idea to see your child’s doctor.

 

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