Skin Eruptions in Infants

Skin Eruptions in Infants

When it pertains to your baby’s skin, you can depend on one thing: It’s bound to appear into a rash during the first year. Why? The human skin functions as a protective barrier versus all sorts of aspects, from sun to bacteria, but it takes about a year for that skin to get up to speed and operate effectively, says Bernard Cohen, M.D., director of pediatric dermatology at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center.

Skin Eruptions in Infants

It starts thinner, has less pigment, and doesn’t control temperature as well as the skin of larger kids and grownups. Naturally, no baby escapes the most common skin concern – diaper rash. The diaper area is warm and wet, which breaks down the skin on that tender tush. Add irritating poop and pee and you’ve got the ideal environment for breakouts. Keep diaper rash under control by altering your baby typically, utilizing petroleum jelly or a barrier cream with zinc oxide to safeguard his bum, and letting his naked bottom air out occasionally (put a sheet on the floor and let him loose). Safeguard the rest of that vulnerable birthday suit with moderate products, such as hypoallergenic and fragrance-free soaps, washes and creams. Once your baby turns 1, you can relax a little – his skin will be thicker and more rash-proof.

Intertrigo

what it is:

A rash found mainly in a baby’s skin folds, specifically in the neck. It usually appears in chubby children under 6 months.

what it appears like:

A red, raw, weepy rash that looks even worse inside the skin creases. Your baby may not observe it at all or it might cause some pain, depending on the quantity of skin-to-skin friction in the afflicted area.

what causes it:

Extreme wetness from drool and spitup that collect in your baby’s creases, which don’t get any air.

what to do:

Wash out the inside of your baby’s skin folds with water and apply a zinc-oxide barrier cream or petroleum jelly to safeguard them, recommends Dan Brennan, M.D., a pediatrician in Santa Barbara, CA. As babies get older and more mobile – they crane their necks-intertrigo goes away.

Prickly Heat

what it is:

Likewise known as miliaria, prickly heat rash may happen on the face, neck, back or bottom.

what it looks like:

Tiny red bumps.

what causes it:

Because a baby’s skin isn’t able to manage heat well, says Dr. Cohen, just about anything that overheats your child– hot, humid weather; overbundling him in tight clothing; or a long, hot car trip while strapped in a safety seat– can trigger a prickly heat rash.

what to do:

Get your baby out of the heat and dress him in loose, cool clothes. The rash ought to look much better in about Thirty Minutes.

Skin Eruptions in Infants

Seborrhea

what it is:

A rash that can appear on the scalp and eyebrows (where it’s known as cradle cap), behind the ears, or on the neck, cheeks and chest. It’s most common in babies under 6 months.

what it looks like:

On the scalp and eyebrows, seborrhea looks like dandruff, although it can also appear like thick, yellow or crusty scales. Behind the ears, seborrhea has the tendency to look split and scaly; on the chest and neck, it may be pimply, and on the cheeks, it’s red and bumpy. It can be unsightly but probably will not bother your baby at all.

what causes it:

Nobody knows.

what to do:

The standard solution is to rub a little olive or baby oil on your baby’s scalp to loosen up the scales, then gently brush them off. Dr. Brennan also suggests cleaning the scalp, behind the ears, and other spots with a percentage of anti-dandruff shampoo.

Eczema

what it is:

Eczema can appear anywhere on a baby’s body beginning around 3 or 4 months, though it’s not normally found in the diaper area. Up to 20 percent of children will develop this very itchy rash.

what it looks like:

In its mildest type, eczema emerges in dry, irregular areas on the skin. It can also look like a bad case of windburn and cause the skin to redden, exude pus and crust over.

what causes it:

Anything can be a trigger for children prone to eczema (those with a genetic predis-position or a family history of allergies). Heat can cause sweating, which aggravates the skin; cold weather can dry it out. Soaps and clothing, particularly wool, can likewise stimulate an outbreak.

what to do:

Wash the skin with a gentle, fragrance-free cleanser – ask your pediatrician or dermatologist for a suggestion – and after that slather moisturizer onto damp skin twice a day. For a more severe case, speak to your doctor about a steroid ointment, which will decrease the inflammation.

Contact Dermatitis

what it is:

A skin response to something your baby was available in contact with – from soaps and detergents to turf and other plants.

what it appears like:

Red, itchy bumps at the contact site.

what causes it:

If the rash is all over your baby’s body, then soap or cleaning agent is most likely to blame. If the chest and arms are affected, the offender could be a new, unwashed t-shirt. Rashy legs? For some super-sensitive babies, all it takes is the unknown texture of a rug or lawn.

what to do:

If the rash looks dry, hydrate it. If it’s not troubling your baby, just remove the trigger (roll up the carpet, wash the shirt, attempt a milder soap, a gentler laundry cleaning agent). If the rash is itchy, talk with your doctor about a hydrocortisone cream or an antihistamine.

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