Is It Safe for Babies to Sleep in Swing

Is It Safe for Babies to Sleep in Swing

How long can I leave my baby in a swing?

There are no set rules, though most professionals suggest restricting your baby’s time in a motorized swing to an hour or less a day.

That’s since she needs to develop the motor skills that will eventually lead to crawling, pulling up, and cruising– and sitting in a swing won’t assist her do that. It’s likewise important to hold and interact with your baby as she develops physically and mentally.

Naturally, numerous parents discover that a baby swing is a proven method to relax a crying baby. If your baby’s picky or colicky, pediatrician and mama Dawn Rosenberg Jha states it’s alright to use the swing to peaceful her. She also recommends other methods of relaxing, such as holding or swaddling your baby.

The balanced rocking movement of the swing might very well put your baby to sleep. It’s great to let her sleep in the swing for a brief time while you’re nearby, just use good sense.

Do not leave your baby ignored in a swing. And even if you’re busy doing something else, ensure you can always see and hear her.

You ought to never leave your baby oversleeping swings, strollers and other sitting devices. This is particularly true if your baby is under 4 months old. At that age, they are like mini contortionists and may wiggle into a position that can obstruct their air passage or risk suffocation. After all, neck control is limited in young babies. If you leave your baby sleeping while sitting, there’s an opportunity that her head might tip forward or to the side at an awkward and potentially deadly angle.

Is It Safe for Babies to Sleep in Swing

” Unlike baby cribs or bassinettes, swings are not intended for sleep and may not be safe,” states Rosenberg Jha. “But if you’re keeping an eye on your baby, and she drops off to sleep in the swing for a nap, there’s no have to wake her.”

You can likewise do a couple of things to make the swing more secure for a sleeping baby. Don’t pad the swing with loose pillows or blankets since they’re a SIDS risk. Strap your baby in safely, and keep the seat in the most reclined position up until she can hold up her head unassisted. Turn off the swing after your baby falls asleep.

The Consumer Item Safety Commission (CPSC) approved new safety standards for baby swings in 2012 to prevent unexpected injuries or deaths, which can occur when babies tumble out or downturn forward till they cannot breathe. The CPSC encourages looking for a swing with a five-point harness to hold your baby safely. It’s also a smart idea to examine the CPSC’s list of product remembers before you purchase a swing.

Finally, check out the instruction book for your baby’s swing carefully, and follow any precautionary procedures the manufacturer suggests.

 

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