Ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) Dosing for Children

Ibuprofen

Taking ibuprofen can assist children feel much better when they have colds or minor injuries. Similar to all drugs, it is necessary to offer children the proper dose. Ibuprofen is safe when taken as directed. However taking too much of this medication can be hazardous.

Alternative names: Motrin; Advil

How ibuprofen can help your child

Ibuprofen is a type of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It can help:

  • Lower aches, pain, sore throat, or fever in children with a cold or the influenza
  • Relieve headaches or toothaches
  • Reduce pain and swelling from an injury or broken

Appropriate Dosing of IbupIbuprofenrofen (Motrin, Advil) for Children

Ibuprofen can be taken as liquid or chewable tablets. To provide the proper dose, you need to know your child’s weight.

You likewise have to understand how much ibuprofen remains in a tablet, teaspoon (tsp), 1.25 milliliters (mL), or 5 mL of the product you are utilizing. You can read the label to find out.

  • For chewable tablets, the label will tell you the number of milligrams (mg) are discovered in each tablet, for example 50 mg per tablet.
  • For liquids, the label will inform you how many mg are found in 1 tsp, in 1.25 mL, or in 5mL. For example, the label may check out 100 mg/1 tsp, 50 mg/1.25 mL, or 100 mg/5 mL.

For syrups, you need some type of dosing syringe. It might come with the medicine, or you can ask your pharmacist. Make certain to clean it out after every usage.

If your child weighs 12 to 17 pounds (lbs):

  • For baby drops that state 50mg/1.25 mL on the label, give a 1.25 mL dose.
  • For liquid that states 100 mg/1 teaspoon (tsp) on the label, provide a 1/2 tsp dose.
  • For liquid that state 100 mg/5 mL on the label, give a 2.5 mL dosage.

If your child weighs 18 to 23 pounds:

  • For baby drops that state 50mg/1.25 mL on the label, provide a 1.875 mL dose.
  • For liquid that states 100 mg/1 tsp on the label, provide a 3/4 tsp dose.
  • For liquid that states 100 mg/5 mL on the label, offer a 4 mL dosage.

If your child weighs 24 to 35 pounds:

  • For infant drops that state 50mg/1.25 mL on the label, give a 2.5 mL dose.
  • For liquid that state 100 mg/1 tsp on the label, give a 1 tsp dose.
  • For liquid that state 100 mg/5 mL on the label, provide a 5 mL dose.
  • For chewable tablets that state 50 mg tablets on the label, offer 2 tablets.

If your child weighs 36 to 47 lbs:

  • For infant drops that state 50mg/1.25 mL on the label, provide a 3.75 mL dosage.
  • For liquid that state 100 mg/1 tsp on the label, provide a 1 1/2 tsp dose.
  • For liquid that state 100 mg/5 mL on the label, give a 7.5 mL dosage.
  • For chewable tablets that state 50 mg tablets on the label, give 3 tablets.

If your child weighs 48 to 59 lbs:

  • For baby drops that state 50mg/1.25 mL on the label, give a 5 mL dose.
  • For liquid that state 100 mg/1 tsp on the label, give a 2 tsp dose.
  • For liquid that states 100 mg/5 mL on the label, provide a 10 mL dosage.
  • For chewable tablets that state 50 mg tablets on the label, offer 4 tablets.
  • For junior-strength tablets that state 100 mg tablets on the label, provide 2 tablets.

Ibuprofen

If your child weighs 60 to 71 lbs:

  • For liquid that states 100 mg/1 tsp on the label, give a 2 1/2 tsp dosage.
  • For liquid that states 100 mg/5 mL on the label, provide a 12.5 mL dosage.
  • For chewable tablets that state 50 mg tablets on the label, give 5 tablets.
  • For junior-strength tablets that say 100 mg tablets on the label, give 2 1/2 tablets.

If your child weighs 72 to 95 lbs:

  • For liquid that states 100 mg/1 tsp on the label, offer a 3 tsp dose.
  • For liquid that states 100 mg/5 mL on the label, provide a 15 mL dose.
  • For chewable tablets that state 50 mg tablets on the label, provide 6 tablets.
  • For junior-strength tablets that state 100 mg tablets on the label, offer 3 tablets.

If your child weighs 96 pounds or more:

  • For liquid that states 100 mg/1 tsp on the label, give a 4 tsp dose.
  • For liquid that state 100 mg/5 mL on the label, give a 20 mL dosage.
  • For chewable tablets that state 50 mg tablets on the label, provide 8 tablets.
  • For junior-strength tablets that state 100 mg tablets on the label, provide 4 tablets.

Attempt providing your child the medication with food to avoid indigestion. If you are uncertain how much to provide your child, call your healthcare service provider.

Do not offer ibuprofen to children under 6 months of age, unless directed by your service provider. You ought to also check with your supplier before providing ibuprofen to children under 2 years old or less than 12 pounds.

Offering medicine to children

Make certain you don’t provide your child more than one medicine with ibuprofen. For instance, ibuprofen can be discovered in lots of allergic reaction and cold remedies. Read the label prior to offering any medication to children. You ought to not give medicine with more than one active component to children under age 6.

There are necessary child medication safety pointers to follow.

  • Carefully check out all of the directions on the label prior to providing your child medicine.
  • Make sure you know the strength of the medication in the bottle you acquired.
  • Use the syringe, dropper, or dosing cup that comes with your child’s liquid medicine. You can also get one at your regional drug store.
  • Make sure you are using the right unit of measurement when filling medicine. You may have the choice of milliliters (mL) or teaspoon (tsp) dosing.
  • If you are not exactly sure what medicine to give your child, call your health care company.

Children with certain medical conditions or taking particular medicines should not take ibuprofen. Contact your provider.

If your child takes too much

Make sure to publish the number for the poison nerve center by your home phone. If you think your child has taken too much medicine, call the poison nerve center at 1-800-222-1222. It is open 24 Hr a day. Signs of poisoning include nausea, vomiting, fatigue, and abdominal pain.

Go to the nearest emergency room. Your child might need:

  • Triggered charcoal. Charcoal stops the body from absorbing the medicine. It needs to be provided within an hour. It does not work for each medicine.
  • To be confessed to the medical facility to be kept an eye on.
  • Blood tests to see what the medication is doing.
  • To have his or her heart rate, breathing rate, and high blood pressure kept track of.

When to call the doctor

Call your healthcare supplier if:

  • You are uncertain what dosage of medicine to provide your baby or child.
  • You are having trouble getting your child to take medicine.
  • Your child’s symptoms do not disappear when you would anticipate.
  • Your child is an infant and has signs of health problem, such as fever.
Baby Health Blog: We Help to Take Care
Leave a Reply