Damaged Front Teeth in Baby

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Trauma to primary teeth happens often. Fortunately, many children have little if any visible damage to the baby teeth after trauma, nevertheless, it is possible for problems to establish following a terrible dental occurrence so the teeth ought to be monitored closely. Trauma to permanent front teeth is likewise typical but the impacts can be more severe. These injuries can influence the advancement of the teeth in addition to the function and health of the child’s mouth. In some cases root canals may be necessary to save permanent teeth after they have had a terrible injury.

We advise early assessment after a mishap to permit us to examine the intensity of tooth trauma and form a plan for monitoring it gradually, if required. As a patient of record in our workplace, you will have access to an “on-call” pediatric dentist if an accident occurs after office hours.

Below are numerous various types of trauma. Click any links for pictures (coming quickly).

Types of tooth trauma

Concussion – the tooth has received a blow or bump that has hurt the supporting structures without loosening it. Typically you will notice a percentage of bleeding around the gums surrounding the tooth but the tooth is not mobile or “wiggly”. Treatment normally includes tracking with X-Rays and keeping track of for signs and symptoms that can suggest additional problems.

Damaged Front Teeth in Baby
Damaged Front Teeth in Baby

Subluxation – the tooth has gotten a blow or bump that has actually bruised the surrounding structure of the tooth and its root causing the tooth to become mobile. There will usually be some bleeding around the gums surrounding the tooth and the tooth will be mobile or “wiggly”. Treatment normally involves monitoring with X-Rays and keeping track of for signs and symptoms that can indicate more problems.

Luxation – the tooth has been knocked out of position by the injury and the surrounding structures of the tooth and its roots have been damaged. Treatment for baby teeth involves manipulating the tooth back into place if it can be done quickly. If the tooth’s new position is not interfering with the child’s bite or with the growth of the permanent teeth then sometimes the tooth can be left as it is and it will be kept track of for any symptoms and signs that indicate more problems. In some cases the baby tooth has been knocked out of position so much that it has to be drawn out (gotten). For irreversible teeth the tooth has to be positioned back in position. Typically the tooth will then need to be splinted in location. Often times a root canal is suggested.

Avulsion – the tooth has actually been knocked totally from the mouth. For baby teeth there is no treatment showed as it is not recommended to put the baby tooth back in. For permanent teeth the tooth is re-implanted (placed back in the socket) if it has not been out of the mouth too long. The tooth is then splinted in location for numerous weeks. A root canal or other advanced treatments of the root will be needed to save the tooth.

Invasion – the tooth has been hit and pushed back up into the gums. For baby teeth the position of the intruded tooth has to be figured out to suggest whether the tooth will need to be eliminated or if it can continue to be and just monitor for signs and symptoms of additional problems. If the primary teeth is left it will in some cases re-erupt in time. For long-term teeth the tooth will generally have to be rearranged orthodontically (with braces). A root canal or other advanced treatments of the root will be needed to conserve the tooth.

 

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