Can Children Take Acetaminophen (Tylenol) and When?

Acetaminophen (uh-see-tuh-MI-nuh-fen) is an over-the-counter medicine taken to ease fever and pain. It’s a safe drug when used correctly for a wide array of problems, but taking expensive a dose can make a child really sick. Overdosing can result in liver damage and, in unusual cases, even death. So it’s important to know how to correctly provide the medication.

If you have any concerns about providing acetaminophen to your child, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Never offer this medicine (or any other kind of medicine) to a child younger than 2 years old without getting a doctor’s OK first.

Acetaminophen, such as Tylenol, helps reduce fever and alleviate pain. It does not reduce swelling, as do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen, however it also is less most likely to cause stomach upset and other side effects.

What Is Acetaminophen Also Called?

Acetaminophen is the generic name of this drug. In some other countries, acetaminophen is referred to as paracetamol. Numerous generic brand names of acetaminophen are readily available.

The most typical trademark name for this medicine is Tylenol ®, however it is likewise sold under the names Panadol ®, FeverAll ®,and Tempra ®.

What Types Are Readily available?

For kids, this medication is offered in oral suspensions (liquid form) as well as chewable tablets. Chewable tablets are not advised for children below 2 since they are a choking risk. Rectal suppositories (FeverAll ® or Tempra ®) are available for children who have problem taking medicine by mouth or can’t keep medicines down due to vomiting.

Tylenol ® makes Infants’ Tylenol ® (” drops”) and Children’s Tylenol ® oral suspensions, in addition to Jr. Tylenol ® chewable tablets. Many generic brands of acetaminophen are readily available in comparable types.

Tylenol ® and other brands that make baby drops used to offer them in a more focused formula, which was 80 mg/0.8 ml per dosage. These drops were removed the market since babies were getting ill after parents mistakenly provided excessive medication while utilizing kitchen teaspoons or measuring cups from Children’s Tylenol ®. If you have Infants’ Tylenol ® or a comparable item in the 80 mg strength, throw the item away and do not give it to your child. The brand-new baby drops have the exact same concentration as Children’s Tylenol ® (160 mg/5 ml per dose).

Giving Acetaminophen

Describe the following dosage charts for the right dosage of acetaminophen. And be sure to:

  • Inspect the expiration date to make sure it’s not ended. If it is, throw the medicine away and purchase a new item. For appropriate disposal, eliminate the medicine from its original container and place it in an unwanted substance that children or animals would not be tempted to eat, like coffee grounds or kitty litter. Then, put it in a sealable bag inside a trash bin.
  • Make certain your child isn’t really already taking medications with acetaminophen in them. Acetaminophen is a typical component in cough, cold, and allergic reaction medications. If your child is taking one, speak with your doctor or pharmacist prior to giving your child more acetaminophen. Excessive acetaminophen can damage a child’s liver.
  • Check the concentration and recommended dose, and offer your child a dose from the dropper, syringe, or cup that included the product. This will help make sure that your child gets the right quantity of milliliters, or ml (also called cc, or cubic centimeters), and does not overdose. Never ever use a determining spoon from the cooking area or a cup or dropper from a different product. Chewables are not suggested for children younger than 2 years of ages due to the risk of choking.
  • When offering for a fever, think about the child’s temperature level and age. If you have an infant 3 months or more youthful with a rectal temperature level of 100.4 ° F( 38 ° C) or greater, call your doctor or go to the emergency department right away. If your child is between 3 months and 3 years of ages and has a fever of 102.2 ° F( 39 ° C )or greater, call your doctor to discover if he or she has to see your child.
  • If your child spits up or vomits up a dosage of acetaminophen within the first 20 minutes, it’s generally safe to offer your child another dosage (talk to a doctor if you’re uncertain). If your child holds the first dose down for longer than 20 minutes before spitting up, you ought to wait 4 hours or more before providing your child another dosage.
  • Provide acetaminophen every 4 to 6 hours as needed, however never offer your child more than 5 doses in 24 hours.

Dosage Charts

Medical professionals advise utilizing a child’s weight rather of age when figuring out how much medication to offer. Prior to offering your child a dosage, examine the label to make sure the advised dosage and concentration concur with the numbers below.

This chart is based on medical professionals’ and the makers’ recommendations and is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. If your child is age 2 or more youthful, get approval from the doctor before offering the medicine. And always call your doctor with any questions or issues about providing medication.

WeightAcetaminophen Infants’ Liquid

( 160 mg/5 ml)
6-11 lbs
( 0-3 months) Ask your doctor
12-17 lbs
( 4-11 months) Ask your doctor
18-23 pounds
( 12-23 months) Ask your doctor
24-35 lbs
( 2-3 years) 1 teaspoon (5 ml, or complete 5-ml dosing syringe)

WeightAcetaminophen Children’s Liquid

( 160 mg/5 ml)
12-17 lbs
( 4-11 months) Ask your doctor
18-23 lbs
( 12-23 months) Ask your doctor
24-35 lbs
( 2-3 years) 1 teaspoon (5 ml, or full 5-ml dosing syringe)
36-47 pounds
( 4-5 years) 1 1/2 teaspoons (7.5 ml)
48-59 lbs
( 6-8 years) 2 teaspoons (10 ml)
60-71 lbs
( 9-10 years) 2 1/2 teaspoons (12.5 ml)
72-95 lbs
( 11 years) 3 teaspoons (15 ml)

WeightAcetaminophen Jr. Strength Chewables

( 160 mg)
24-35 pounds
( 2-3 years) Not suggested
36-47 lbs
( 4-5 years) Not suggested
48-59 lbs
( 6-8 years) 2 tablets
60-71 pounds
( 9-10 years) 2 1/2 tablets
72-95 pounds
( 11 years) 3 tablets



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